- DTN Headline News
USDA Weekly Crop Progress
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 7:03AM CDT

By Cheri Zagurski
DTN Managing Editor

OMAHA (DTN) -- Despite what seemed to be a very soggy week in some areas of the Corn Belt, the percentage of the nation's corn crop that was planted increased to 45% as of May 1, according to USDA's weekly Crop Progress report. That's 15 percentage points ahead of last week's total and the five-year average of 30%.

Corn is 13% emerged, compared to 5% last year and a five-year average of 8%.

"Monday's report should be viewed as mildly bearish for corn," said DTN Analyst Todd Hultman.

Soybean planting is 8% complete, compared to 10% last year and a five-year average of 6%. "Monday's report should be viewed as neutral for soybeans," said Hultman.

Winter wheat is 42% headed, compared to 26% last week, 39% last year and 34% on average. Winter wheat condition improved slightly to 61% good to excellent compared to 59% last week.

"USDA's condition ratings resulted in a six-point increase in the DTN Winter Wheat Condition Index to 157," Hultman said. "DTN's index is up from 105 a year ago and well above the five-year average of 79. Monday's report is bearish for winter wheat."

Spring wheat is 54% planted and 22% emerged, compared with 69% and 24% last year and 39% and 14% on average. "Monday's report is mildly bearish for spring wheat," Hultman said.

Cotton is 16% planted, compared to 10% last week, 15% last year and an 18% average. Rice is 72% planted and 55% emerged, compared to 62% and 38% last week, 55% and 34% last year, and 56% and 39% on average.

Sorghum is 23% planted compared to 20% last week, 28% last year and a 26% average. Oats are 78% planted and 56% emerged, compared to 71% and 41% last week, 81% and 53% last year and 65% and 47% averages. Barley is 57% planted and 29% emerged, compared to 45% and 15% last week, 70% and 33% last year, and 47% and 18% averages.

The following are highlights from weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states. To view the full reports from each state, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov

Colorado

Planting activities progressed well early last week until a wintry precipitation event resulted in cool, wet conditions that prevailed through week's end. By Sunday night, virtually the whole of Colorado had received precipitation in the form of rain or snow.

Days suitable for fieldwork was at 3.9. Topsoil moisture was 2% very short, 9% short, 76% adequate and 13% surplus. Subsoil moisture is 4% very short, 15% short, 75% adequate and 6% surplus.

Corn is 19% planted with a five year average of 22% planted. Sorghum is 1% planted with a 2% planted five year average. Spring wheat is 51% planted with a 57% five year average and spring is 16% emerged with a five year of 23%.

Winter wheat is 67% pastured with a 45% five year average and 1% jointed with a five year average of 3%. Winter wheat crop condition is 12% very poor to poor, 23% fair and 65% good to excellent.

Barley is 75% planted with a 70% five year average and barley is 33% emerged with a five year average of 34%.

Illinois

Rain slowed down planting progress and kept producers out of the field during the past week. Statewide, the average temperature was 58.0 degrees, 1.3 degrees above normal. Precipitation averaged 1.64 inches, 0.74 inches above normal.

There were 2.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 1. Topsoil moisture supply was rated at 3% short, 71% adequate and 26% surplus. Subsoil moisture supply was rated at 6% short, 77% adequate and 17% surplus.

Corn planted was at 66%, up 24 percentage points from last week. Corn emerged was at 25%, compared to 11% last year and the 5-year average of 12%. Soybeans planted was at 9%.

Winter wheat headed jumped to 29%, up 27 percentage points from last week. Winter wheat condition was rated 5 percent very poor to poor, 27 percent fair, 68% good to excellent.

Oats planted reached 90%, compared to 87% last year. Oat condition was at 3% very poor to poor, 14% fair and 83% good to excellent.

Indiana

Cooler temperatures in Northern Indiana along with strong weekend storms and increased precipitation in Central and Southern Indiana slowed planting progress. The beginning of the week was mild, but gave way for moderate to heavy rainfall through the weekend.

Much of the precipitation occurred from Central Indiana downward, bring severe weather in some areas. Statewide average temperatures were slightly above normal at 58.9 degrees. Statewide precipitation was 1.82 inches, above normal by 0.92 inches. There were 2.8 days available for fieldwork for the week ending May 1, down 1.2 days from the previous week.

Topsoil moisture was 0% very short, 2% short, 59% adequate and 39% surplus. Subsoil moisture was 1% very short, 2% short, 71% adequate and 26% surplus.

Corn planted in the state was 30% with a five year average of 22%. Corn emerged was at 4% this week with a five year average of 7%. Soybean planting was 6% with a five year of 8%.

Winter wheat was 81% jointed with a five year average of 60%. Winter wheat was 14% headed with a five year average of 9%. Winter wheat crop conditions were 4% very to poor, 18% fair and 78% good to excellent.

There have been some aerial applications on headed wheat to defend against stripe rust and head scab.

Iowa

Although some fieldwork was done early in the week, as the week progressed rains halted planting across much of Iowa for the week ending May 1, 2016. Statewide there were only 2.0 days suitable for fieldwork. Cool and wet weather slowed crop emergence, and many reports indicate tile lines have been running steady.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0% very short, 1% short, 74% adequate and 25% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0% very short, 1% short, 84% adequate and 15% surplus. The western third of Iowa reported 20% or more with surplus subsoil moisture.

Statewide, just 17% of the corn crop was planted during the past week. But with 57% of the crop planted, progress remained 1 day ahead of last year and 8 days ahead of the 5-year average. Corn was 7% emerged with a five year average of 3%.

Seven percent of the soybean acreage has been planted, 5 days ahead of the 5-year average.

Ninety-six percent of the state's oat crop has been planted, 2 days ahead of last year and 2 weeks ahead of normal. Oats emerged reached 68%, 4 days ahead of the previous year and 8 days ahead of the average. The season's first oat condition rating came in at 1 percent very poor to poor, 28 percent fair, 71 percent good to excellent.

Kansas

For the week ending May 1, 2016, temperatures were two to six degrees below normal in the western half of the State, but near normal in the east. The state received up to five inches of rain in the northeast, with lesser amounts elsewhere.

There were 2.4 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture rated 3% very short, 8% short, 72% adequate and 17% surplus. Subsoil moisture rated 4% very short, 13% short, 77% adequate and 6% surplus.

Winter wheat condition rated 2% very poor, 8% poor, 38% fair, 46% good and 6% excellent. Winter wheat jointed was 97%, ahead of 87% last year and the five-year average of 79%. Headed was 49%, ahead of 34% last year and well ahead of 28% average.

Corn planted was 50%, near 46% last year, but ahead of 41% average. Emerged was 27%, ahead of 20% last year and 16% average. Soybeans planted was 2%, near 5% last year and 4% average.

Michigan

There were 2.8 days suitable for fieldwork in Michigan during the week ending May 1, 2016. Prospects for an early start to spring planting faded as colder than normal temperatures combined with rain activity most days limited field work opportunities and slowed growth in pastures and hay fields.

Topsoil moisture was at 1% very poor, 3% short, 50% adequate and 46% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels were 0% very poor, 1% short, 67% adequate and 32% surplus.

Corn is 8% planted with the five year average of 12%. Soybeans were 2% down from the 4% five year average. While corn and soybean planting started in a few southern counties, cool soil temperatures have delayed planting in most parts of the state, and slowed emergence in places where some planting had taken place.

Oats are 32% planted compared to the five year average of 44% and oats are 6% emerged and the five year average is 18%. Winter wheat is 35% jointed. Winter wheat crop conditions are 8% very poor to poor, 20% fair and 72% good to excellent.

Oat planting, while making good progress this week, was still behind schedule. Wheat was greening up in the north and was jointing in the south; growers applied nitrogen and herbicide to wheat fields as conditions permitted.

Minnesota

Rain showers combined with below average temperatures slowed fieldwork during the week ending May 1, 2016. There were only 2.0 days suitable for fieldwork, though conditions in the northern and southeastern parts of the state allowed more opportunity for planting. Producers in a few areas were concerned about the effects of the cool and wet conditions on crop germination and emergence, though many others noted that the moisture received during the week was beneficial.

Topsoil moisture supplies were rated 1% very short, 6% short, 80% adequate and 13% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 1% very short, 7% short, 80% adequate and 12% surplus.

Minnesota's corn planting increased to 59% complete, 13 days ahead of the 5-year average, but 2 days behind last year. Five percent of the corn crop has emerged, 4 days ahead of average.

Six percent of the soybean crop has been planted, which is equal to the average, but 4 days behind last year. Small grain seeding continues to be well ahead of average, nearing completion in the west-central and southwestern parts of the state.

Spring wheat planting was 63% complete, 16 days ahead of average, but 13 days behind last year. Twenty-seven percent of the spring wheat crop had emerged, 6 days ahead of average, but 4 days behind last year.

Eighty-two percent of the oat acreage had been planted, with 53% emerged, over 2 weeks ahead of the average. The barley crop was 46% planted and 18% emerged.

Missouri

Rain last week slowed down planting of some row crops. Temperatures averaged 61.9 degrees, 3.0 degrees above normal. Precipitation averaged 2.33 inches statewide, 1.27 inches above normal. There were 2.1 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending May 1. Topsoil moisture: 3% very short, 8% short, 72% adequate, and 17% surplus. Subsoil moisture: 3% very short, 12% short, 80% adequate, and 5% surplus. Spring tillage is 87% complete, compared to 57% last year and 65% for the 5-year average.

Nebraska

For the week ending May 1, 2016, wet, cool conditions kept producers from making widespread planting progress, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Snow blanketed the southwest as well as Panhandle counties late in the week with accumulations of six inches or more recorded in portions of the Panhandle. Statewide rainfall of one to two inches was common with heavier amounts of five inches or more were recorded in central Nebraska. Temperatures averaged four to six degrees below normal. Producers were waiting for soils to dry before planting could resume. There were 1.6 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture: 1% very short, 6% short, 70% adequate, and 23% surplus. Subsoil moisture: 1% very short, 6% short, 82% adequate, and 11% surplus.

North Dakota

For the week ending May 1, 2016, temperatures averaged two to four degrees below normal in the northeast part of the state and four to ten degrees below normal in the southwest, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Rainfall up to an inch was received in the southern parts of the state with little precipitation in the north. The much-needed moisture aided pasture growth and improved planting conditions. There were 3.8 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture: 0% very short, 7% short, 86% adequate, and 7% surplus. Subsoil moisture: 1% very short, 14% short, 81% adequate, and 4% surplus. Canola planted was 11%, behind 22% last year, but near 10% average. Sunflowers planted was 1%, ahead of 0% last year, but equal to average. Sugarbeets planted was 74%, behind 91% last year, but well ahead of 38% average.

Ohio

Rain throughout the week kept growers in the northern parts of the state from doing fieldwork, while growers in the south were afforded more opportunities to plant crops, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician of the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 2.8 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending May 1. The rain and cool temperatures in the northern counties limited most fieldwork to topdressing wheat and spraying for weeds. Some fields had standing water as well. Growers further south had more ideal weather for planting, and planted corn, oats, and even some soybeans. Producers throughout the state reported slow hay and pasture growth. Growers are also applying fertilizer when able to get into fields. Topsoil moisture: 0% very short, 1% short, 57% adequate, 42% surplus. Subsoil moisture: 0% very short, 2% short, 70% adequate, 28% surplus. Days suitable for fieldwork: 2.8 days.

Oklahoma

Much of Oklahoma experienced heavy rain throughout the week in addition to flooding, hail and severe winds. According to the Mesonet, this April was the seventh wettest on record with a statewide average of 6.11 inches, almost 3 inches above normal. Moderate drought conditions stayed at 10%, no change from last week and severe drought was 2%, also no change from last week. Precipitation averaged 1.99 inches across the state, ranging from 0.74 of an inch in the West Central district to 4.51 inches in the Southeast district. Statewide temperatures averaged in the low 60s, with the lowest recording of 32 degrees at Goodwell on Saturday, April 30, and the highest recording of 92 degrees at Altus on Monday, April 25. Topsoil and subsoil moisture conditions were rated mostly adequate to short. There were 3.5 days suitable for fieldwork.

South Dakota

For the week ending May 1, 2016, cold, wet weather across much of the state kept fieldwork to a minimum, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Most locations received one-half to one inch of precipitation during the week, with heavier amounts in the south-central and southeast. Snowfall was reported in western South Dakota as temperatures were well below normal for most of the state. There were 1.3 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture: 0% very short, 7% short, 75% adequate, and 18% surplus. Subsoil moisture: 1% very short, 9% short, 79% adequate, and 11% surplus.

Texas

The majority of the state received precipitation last week, which caused planting delays for many of the state's crops. Areas of East Texas received between 2 to 8 inches, while areas of Central Texas received only 0.1 to 1.5 inches. The Trans-Pecos and areas of the High Plains and the Upper Coast reported little to no rainfall. Strong winds and hail were reported in several areas of the state. Winter wheat and oats continued to mature throughout the state, with some hail damage reported in areas of the Southern Low Plains and the Cross Timbers. Areas of the Edwards Plateau experienced some damage due to high winds. Cotton planting was delayed in areas of the Northern Low and High Plains, the Blacklands, and Northeast Texas, due to wet conditions. Corn was beginning to emerge in areas of the Blacklands and South Texas. Sorghum planting remained active throughout the state, while producers in the Southern Low Plains applied fertilizer. Producers in the Southern High Plains began planting peanuts. Topsoil moisture: 7% very short, 24% short, 49% adequate, 20% surplus. Topsoil moisture: 4% very short, 20% short, 61% adequate, 15% surplus There were 4.8 days suitable for fieldwork.

Wisconsin

There were 4.0 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending May 1, 2016, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Below normal temperatures and widespread rains slowed fieldwork this week. Reporters noted variable rainfall totals from under half an inch to over three inches. This moisture was welcomed in the southern portions of the state, where soils have been dry. However, continuing muddy conditions and low soil temperatures in the Northern and East-Central districts further delayed planting activities. Many reporters commented that winter wheat and alfalfa put on a burst of growth during this cool, wet week. Planting, tillage, and manure spreading continued where conditions allowed. Topsoil moisture: 0% very short, 55 short, 77% adequate, 18% surplus. Subsoil moisture: 0% very short, 4% short, 84% percent adequate, 12% surplus. As of May 1, spring tillage was 53% complete statewide, 1 day behind last year, but 10 days ahead of the five-year average. Corn planting was 2 days behind last year, but 4 days ahead of the five-year average. Corn was starting to emerge in southern parts of the state. Oats planting was 3 days behind 2015, but a week ahead of the five-year average. Oats emerged was 2 days behind 2015, but 3 days ahead of the five-year average.

Send comments to talk@dtn.com

(AG/)

**

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Yr
Week Week Year Avg
Corn Planted 45 30 45 30
Corn Emerged 13 5 7 8
Soybeans Planted 8 3 10 6
Winter Wheat Headed 42 26 39 34
Spring Wheat Planted 54 42 69 39
Spring Wheat Emerged 22 8 24 14
Cotton Planted 16 10 15 18
Sorghum Planted 23 20 28 26
Oats Planted 78 71 81 65
Oats Emerged 56 41 53 47
Barley Planted 57 45 70 47
Barley Emerged 29 15 33 18
Rice Planted 72 62 55 56
Rice Emerged 55 38 34 39
National Crop Condition Summary
(VP=Very Poor; P=Poor; F=Fair; G=Good; E=Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Winter Wht 1 6 32 50 11 1 7 33 50 9 6 14 37 35 8

Please send comments to talk@dtn.com

(MZT/CZ)


blog iconDTN Blogs & Forums
DTN Market Matters Blog
Katie Micik
Markets Editor
Monday, May 2, 2016 12:39PM CDT
Monday, April 25, 2016 1:19PM CDT
Monday, April 18, 2016 2:27PM CDT
Technically Speaking
Darin Newsom
DTN Senior Analyst
Monday, May 2, 2016 6:57AM CDT
Sunday, May 1, 2016 6:42AM CDT
Sunday, May 1, 2016 6:40AM CDT
Fundamentally Speaking
Joel Karlin
DTN Contributing Analyst
Monday, April 25, 2016 12:38PM CDT
Thursday, April 7, 2016 10:11AM CDT
Wednesday, April 6, 2016 10:13AM CDT
DTN Ag Policy Blog
Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 3:36PM CDT
Monday, May 2, 2016 8:34AM CDT
Friday, April 29, 2016 12:31PM CDT
Minding Ag's Business
Marcia Taylor
DTN Executive Editor
Thursday, April 28, 2016 3:53PM CDT
Thursday, April 21, 2016 2:36PM CDT
Wednesday, April 20, 2016 11:17AM CDT
DTN Ag Weather Forum
Bryce Anderson
DTN Ag Meteorologist and DTN Analyst
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 2:08PM CDT
Monday, May 2, 2016 3:09PM CDT
Thursday, April 28, 2016 4:23PM CDT
DTN Production Blog
Pam Smith
Crops Technology Editor
Friday, April 29, 2016 11:49AM CDT
Tuesday, April 19, 2016 4:29PM CDT
Monday, April 11, 2016 8:22AM CDT
Harrington's Sort & Cull
John Harrington
DTN Livestock Analyst
Friday, April 29, 2016 1:57PM CDT
Friday, April 22, 2016 12:16PM CDT
Friday, April 15, 2016 10:34AM CDT
South America Calling
Alastair Stewart
South America Correspondent
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 9:21AM CDT
Friday, April 29, 2016 12:13PM CDT
Thursday, April 28, 2016 4:18PM CDT
An Urban’s Rural View
Urban Lehner
Editor Emeritus
Monday, May 2, 2016 6:23AM CDT
Friday, April 22, 2016 4:44PM CDT
Friday, April 15, 2016 6:22AM CDT
Machinery Chatter
Jim Patrico
Progressive Farmer Senior Editor
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 1:49PM CDT
Wednesday, April 20, 2016 9:25AM CDT
Tuesday, April 12, 2016 1:39PM CDT
Canadian Markets
Cliff Jamieson
Canadian Grains Analyst
Wednesday, May 4, 2016 4:56PM CDT
Monday, May 2, 2016 4:40PM CDT
Friday, April 29, 2016 4:39PM CDT
Editor’s Notebook
Greg D. Horstmeier
DTN Editor-in-Chief
Monday, April 25, 2016 3:10PM CDT
Thursday, April 14, 2016 6:55AM CDT
Monday, April 11, 2016 7:00AM CDT
 
Copyright DTN. All rights reserved. Disclaimer.
Powered By DTN